Preparing Families for the process of Shared Decision Making During ICU Family Meetings

Grants and Contracts Details

Description

This is a one year pilot study whose objective is to collect feasibility and acceptability data for a newly developed ICU Family Meeting Communication Guide. The guide is intended to be used by family members of critically ill patients 24 hours in advance of the family meeting with the ICU team. The guide consists of 6 open-ended questions that were chosen to stimulate high quality communication as conceptualized by the Mulitple Goals Theory. This proposal consists of two phases and will be conducted at two university hospital ICUs (Penn State Hershey Medical Center and the University of Maryland Medical Center). Phase 1 will involve gathering qualitative interview data with key stakeholders after using the Family Meeting Guide. This data will be used to further refine the Guide. Phase 2 will consist of a small, pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial which will randomize participants to receive the intervention or usual care. The outcomes for this trial involve feasibility outcomes (recruitment rate, contamination, etc). We will also measure patient-centered outcomes in preparation for a larger, randomized controlled trial. The primary patient-centered outcome is the Family Satisfaction with ICU care (FS-ICU) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) and subjective stress questionnaires (Impact of Events-revised; IES-R). Communication outcomes will include Communication Quality Analysis (CQA) and the extent to which shared decision making occurred during the family meeting (OPTION-5). This data will serve as preliminary data for a planned, definitive efficacy trial using a larger, RCT design.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/188/31/21

Funding

  • The Pennsylvania State University: $6,238.00

Fingerprint

Explore the research topics touched on by this project. These labels are generated based on the underlying awards/grants. Together they form a unique fingerprint.