A case history of international space station requirement faults

Jane Huffman Hayes, C. M. Inies Raphael, Elizabeth Ashlee Holbrook, David M. Pruett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is never enough time or money to perform Verification and Validation (V&V) or Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) on all aspects of a software development project, particularity for complex computer systems. We have only high-level knowledge of how the potential existence of specific requirements faults increases project risks, and of how specific V&V techniques (requirements tracing, code analysis, etc.) contribute to improved software reliability and reduced risk. An approach to this problem, fault-based analysis, is proposed and a case history of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) International Space Station (ISS) project is presented to illustrate its use. Specifically, a tailored requirement fault taxonomy was used to perform trend analysis of the historical profiles of three ISS computer software configuration items as well as to build a prototype common cause tree. ISS engineers evaluated the results and extracted lessons learned.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 11th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS 2006
Pages17-26
Number of pages10
StatePublished - 2006
Event11th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS 2006 - Stanford, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 15 2006Aug 17 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS
ISSN (Print)2770-8527
ISSN (Electronic)2770-8535

Conference

Conference11th IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems, ICECCS 2006
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityStanford, CA
Period8/15/068/17/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering (all)
  • Computer Science (all)

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