A controlled trial of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for ethnically diverse parents of infants at high risk for cardiopulmonary arrest

Kathleen Dracup, Debra K. Moser, Lynn V. Doering, Peter M. Guzy, Teresa Juarbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Parents of infants hospitalized in the neonatal in-tensive care unit are routinely taught cardiopulmonary resuscita-tion (CPR) as part of the preparation for transition to home. A variety of methods are used to teach CPR knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the psychosocial consequences of three different methods of CPR training for parents of infants at high risk for cardiopulmonary arrest. Design, Setting, and Subjects: In this prospective, multisite clinical trial, 335 parents and other caretakers of infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit were followed for 1 yr. Participants were 69% female, 49% Latino/Latina, with a mean age of 30 ± 8 yrs. Intervention: Subjects initially were randomized to one of four CPR training protocols: a video-only class, an instructor-taught class, an instructor-taught class combined with a social support intervention, and a control group. The social support intervention involved a group discussion after CPR training with regular telephone follow-up over the next 6 months by a nurse. Measurements and Main Results: Data on psychosocial adjustment to illness, anxiety, and depression were collected at baseline, 2 wks, and 3 and 6 months. There were significant differences among the groups over time in anxiety (p = .007) and psychosocial adjustment to illness (p = .001). Parents in the CPR-video protocol had significantly less early anxiety and better postdischarge psychosocial adjustment compared with parents in the social support intervention at 2 wks after hospital discharge. Patterns of change over time, however, supported the efficacy of the CPR-social support intervention or the CPR-instructor protocols when compared with the CPR-video protocol. Conclusion: The results confirm that parents have difficulty adjusting after an infant's discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit and support the positive psychosocial effects of helping parents prepare for a home emergency by teaching CPR. The additional staff resources required to provide parents with social support along with CPR training are not justified based on the findings of the current study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3289-3295
Number of pages7
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • CPR training
  • High-risk neonates
  • Neonatal intensive care
  • Psychosocial adjustment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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