A descriptive profile of health problems, health services utilization, and HIV serostatus among incarcerated male drug abusers

Carl G. Leukefeld, Michele Staton, Matthew L. Hiller, T. K. Logan, Barbara Warner, Keena Shaw, Richard T. Purvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The number of incarcerated offenders is increasing, and many have physical and mental health problems. Drug-involved prisoners exhibit more health problems and greater rates of chronic health problems than prisoners who have not used drugs. Furthermore, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence rates are generally high in prisons. This descriptive study profiles health problems (including HIV) and health services utilization in a sample of drug-involved prisoners from a rural state. HIV seropositivity appeared to be unrelated to drug use, except for marijuana use. Only liver problems were significantly associated with HIV serostatus. A history of mental health treatment was related to a greater likelihood of being HIV+. HIV status was most clearly associated with sexual risk behaviors. These preliminary findings suggest that prisons represent an important site for targeted behavioral health interventions focused on HIV risk reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-175
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project is supported by grant R01-DA1130 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The opinions expressed are those of the authors. Portions of this article were presented at the College on Problems of Drug Dependency Scientific Meeting, San Juan, Puerto Rico in June 2000 and the International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa in August 2000.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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