A Descriptive Study of Cervical Cancer Survivors’ Persistent Smoking Behavior and Perceived Barriers to Quitting

Tia N. Borger, Gabriella E. Puleo, Jessica N.Rivera Rivera, Devin Montgomery, William R. Bowling, Jessica L. Burris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Cervical cancer survivors (CCS) tend to smoke cigarettes at rates much higher than other cancer survivors and women in the general population. However, few studies take a deep dive into the smoking behavior of cervical cancer survivors and none focus on the barriers they experience related to smoking cessation. This study aimed to describe CCS’ tobacco use characteristics, quit attempts, and barriers to quit success. Method: In a concurrent mixed-method design, 50 CCS (94% White nonHispanic) who were diagnosed in the past 5 years and were current smokers at diagnosis provided data via standardized questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Results: More than three-quarters of participants were current smokers at the time of study participation, 25.6% of whom also reported noncigarette tobacco use (e.g., electronic cigarette, cigar, snus). Seventy percent of participants reported making at least one 24 hr quit attempt postdiagnosis, with 61.5% of current smokers preferring to quit without professional advice or counseling and 51.3% preferring to quit without medication assistance. Four themes emerged regarding barriers to smoking cessation: motivation and readiness; confidence and uncertainty; triggers; and social and environmental factors. Conclusions: The rate of smoking in CCS is remarkably high, which may partly be explained by negative attitudes toward and low use of evidence-based treatment as well as multi-level barriers to smoking cessation

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-116
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award numbers K07 CA181351, P30 CA177558, and R25 CA221765, the National Institute of Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health under award number T32 DA035200, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under award number UL1 TR000117. The content of this publication is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 American Psychological Association

Keywords

  • Cancer survivors
  • Cervical cancer
  • Qualitative research
  • Smoking
  • Smoking cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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