A health communication campaign designed to improve study habits and wellness: A feasibility study

John Matkovic, Nicole McKenzie, Jiunn Jye Sheu, Jennifer Glassman, Aaron J. Kruse-Diehr, Tavis Glassman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Academic success and retention remain priorities on college campuses. Excessive cell phone use, test anxiety, and poor sleep habits are all associated with negative academic performance. Objective: To assess college students’ perceptions of a health communication campaign designed to improve study habits and wellness behaviors during exams. Method: Researchers used a cross-sectional research design to assess participants’ (n = 264) perceptions of the study tip messages. Linear regressions were conducted to determine if the number of messages read was predictive of readiness to change. Results: Nearly all participants agreed that the messages were appealing (84.4%), believable (89.8%), relevant (91.5%), provided useful information (91.5%) and a good reminder of how to study (87.1%). Students who reported reading more messages indicated a higher level of readiness to improve their study habits (F(1,219) = 8.89, p =.003, R 2 =.04). Conclusions: Students found the messages useful; their intentions to study increased the more they were exposed to messages.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • health communication
  • intervention
  • study-habits
  • wellness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A health communication campaign designed to improve study habits and wellness: A feasibility study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this