A host-factor interaction and localization map for a plant-adapted rhabdovirus implicates cytoplasm- tethered transcription activators in cell-to-cell movement

Byoung Eun Min, Kathleen Martin, Renyuan Wang, Petra Tafelmeyer, Max Bridges, Michael Goodin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

To identify host factors that play critical roles in processes, including cell-to-cell movement of plant-adapted rhabdovi- ruses, we constructed and validated a high-resolution Nico- tiana benthamiana yeast two-hybrid library. The library was screened with the putative movement protein (sc 4), nu- cleocapsid (N), and matrix (M) proteins of Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV). This resulted in identification of 31 potential host factors. Steady-state localization studies using autofluorescent protein fusions to full-length clones of inter- actors were conducted in transgenic N. benthamiana marker lines. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays were used to validate two-hybrid interactions. The sc4 inter- actor, sc4i21, localized to microtubules. The N interactor, Ni67, localized to punctuate loci on the endoplasmic reticulum. These two proteins are 84% identical homologues of the Arabidopsis phloem-associated transcription activator AtVOZl, and contain functional nuclear localization signals. Sc4i17 is a microtubule-associated motor protein. The M interactor, Mi7, is a nuclear-localized transcription factor. Combined with a binary interaction map for SYNV proteins, our data support a model in which the SYNV nu- cleocapsids are exported from the nucleus and moved cell- to-cell by transcription activators tethered in the cytoplasm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1420-1432
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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