A method for enriching the cadmium content of cigarette smoke and effect of exposure to this smoke on coronary vascular reactivity in the rat

Michael T. Piascik, Rebecca B. Champney, Edward J. Kasarskis, Tina Forrester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

To study the effect of smoke-borne cadmium on the cardiovascular system, a method was developed to vary the cadmium content in the smoke of Kentucky 2R1 reference cigarettes. 2R1 filler tobacco was sprayed with aqueous solutions of CdSO4; cigarettes were prepared from this tobacco and smoked through Cambridge filters. These treatments increased the cadmium content of the cigarette smoke from 0.23 ± 0.01 μg Cd 2R1 cigarette to 0.317 ± 0.029, 2.38 ± 0.092, and 4.9 ± 0.1 μg Cd/cigarette for 500 μm, and 50 mm CdSO4, respectively. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 5 or 23 weeks to smoke from 2R1 reference cigarettes and cigarettes prepared from 2R1 tobacco that was treated with 500 μm CdSO4. Following 5 weeks of smoke exposure, neither kidney cadmium amount nor coronary vascular reactivity to angiotensin was altered in either smoke-exposed group compared to cage controls or sham-smoked animals. After 23 weeks of exposure, cadmium amounts in kidneys from animals exposed to cadmium-enriched smoke were significantly greater than quantities observed in any other group. Exposure to either type of cigarette smoke increased coronary vascular reactivity above either control group. Exposure to cadmium-enriched cigarette smoke increased coronary vascular reactivity to angiotensin above the amount observed following exposure to 2R1 cigarette smoke. This finding indicates that smoke-borne cadmium may mediate the observed increases in coronary vascular reactivity following exposure to cigarette smoke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-532
Number of pages8
JournalToxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Volume81
Issue number3 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1985

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
’ This work was supported by grants from the Tobacco and Health Research Institute of the University of Kentucky and the American Heart Association-Kentucky Affiliate. ’ To whom correspondence should be addressed: Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. 40536.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology

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