A review of unmanned aerial vehicles, citizen science, and interferometry remote sensing in landslide hazards: Applications in transportation routes and mining environments

Panagiotis Partsinevelos, Zacharias Agioutantis, Achilleas Tripolitsiotis, Nathaniel Schaefer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Landslides have historically affected multiple aspects of civilization, such as infrastructure, transportation, and even human lives. Their occurrence and evolution are quite versatile in terms of triggering mechanisms, volume, scale, and dynamics, and thus, several practices have been implemented to assess them, based on geodetic, geotechnical, remote sensing, and hybrid instrumentation. Remote sensing offers several approaches to model, monitor, and predict landslides from space, air, and land. New trends of remote sensing under the context of landslide modeling are demonstrated, including unmanned aerial systems, citizen science, and radar interferometry. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and citizen science practices have not yet reached maturity, thus providing recurring applications and lack of a common methodological approach. Nevertheless, radar interferometry has been applied in several studies that demonstrate centimeter deformation detection. A series of paradigms are presented regarding transportation networks and mining-induced landslides.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRemote Sensing of Hydrometeorological Hazards
Pages469-492
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781498777599
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Mathematics
  • General Engineering
  • General Earth and Planetary Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A review of unmanned aerial vehicles, citizen science, and interferometry remote sensing in landslide hazards: Applications in transportation routes and mining environments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this