Accelerometer-measured patterns of shared physical activity among mother-young child dyads

Deirdre Dlugonski, Katrina Drowatzky DuBose, Patrick Rider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Many mothers and young children are not meeting physical activity guidelines. Parent–child coparticipation in physical activity (ie, shared physical activity) provides opportunities for social modeling and might be associated with child physical activity. There is very little information about shared physical activity using objective measures. Methods: Participants (N = 17 mother–young child dyads) completed a demographic survey and height/weight measurements, and wore a Bluetooth® accelerometer for 1 week. Accelerometers were initialized using the proximity function to yield both individual and proximity [a minute-by-minute log of whether the 2 accelerometers were in- or out-of-range (~50 m or less)] data. Shared physical activity was calculated in MATLAB by overlaying individual and proximity accelerometer data. Results: Mother–child dyads spent approximately 2 hours per day in shared time that was mostly shared sedentary activities. Less than 1% of shared minutes per day were spent in shared moderate to vigorous physical activity. Conclusions: Mothers and young children spent a small portion of their day in shared activities. Most mother–child shared time was spent in sedentary or light activities rather than moderate to vigorous physical activity. This method for objectively measuring shared physical activity provides novel information about the context in which physical activity occurs and could be used to understand patterns of physical activity among other dyads.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)804-814
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank Dr Alexander M. Schoemann (Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, East Carolina University) for consulting on the statistical analysis for this study. This study was funded by a Research and Creative Activity Award by East Carolina University.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • Health behavior
  • Measurement
  • Pediatrics
  • Physical activity assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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