Adverse childhood experiences and interpersonal violence among college students: does a relationship exist?

Sarah E. Cprek, Bonnie S. Fisher, Madelyn J. McDonald, Honour M. McDaniel, Lucy Williamson, Corrine M. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Previous research has found women who experience eight or more Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are 3.5 times as likely to be victims of adult IPV. This study examined the relationship between ACEs and IPV (physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, and stalking) among college students. Participants: This study was conducted among undergraduate students (N = 2,900) at two large, non-profit, public universities in the United States. Methods: Students completed a web-based survey addressing self-reported ACEs and violence that occurred within the current academic year. Chi-square tests and logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between ACEs and violence. Results: College students with higher ACE scores were more likely to experience violence. Students with ACE scores of four or higher were between 1.9-4.9 times more likely to experience violence. A dose response relationship was found between ACE score and experiences of violence. Conclusions: Campus violence prevention programs may benefit from incorporating discussion of ACEs into programing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)913-920
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume69
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Intimate partner violence
  • child abuse
  • child maltreatment
  • child neglect
  • physical assault
  • physical violence
  • sexual assault
  • sexual violence
  • stalking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Adverse childhood experiences and interpersonal violence among college students: does a relationship exist?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this