Aged F344 rats exhibit an increased proportion of dopamine agonist-excited striatal neurons

John A. Stanford, Clelland R. Gash, Greg A. Gerhardt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

In order to study age-related differences in striatal electrophysiological activity in freely-moving animals, multi-wire electrode arrays were chronically implanted in the striatum of young (6-8 months) and aged (24-26 months) Fischer 344 rats. After recording baseline activity, d-amphetamine (D-AMPH; 1.0 mg/kg) and apomorphine (APO; 0.5 mg/kg) were administered to the two age groups. For both the D-AMPH and APO series, the percentage of striatal neurons that increased firing rates as a result of the DA agonists was 19% higher in the old animals than in the young animals. In addition, D-AMPH increased the firing rates of D-AMPH-excited neurons to a greater extent in the old animals than in the young animals. While the rate-increasing effects of APO did not differ significantly as a function of age, its effects were slightly greater in the old animals as well. These results suggest that age-related decreases in nigrostriatal DA function may result in alterations in the way in which the striatum integrates corticostriatal and nigrostriatal inputs to influence motor function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-270
Number of pages8
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by grants from USPHS AG06434, AG13494, NS39787, and a level II Research Scientist Award (MH01245) to G. Gerhardt.

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Basal ganglia
  • Dopamine
  • Electrophysiology
  • Freely-moving
  • Multiunit
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Aged F344 rats exhibit an increased proportion of dopamine agonist-excited striatal neurons'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this