Alcohol Use, Hostile Sexism, and Religious Self-Regulation: Investigating Risk and Protective Factors of IPV Perpetration

Kellie R. Lynch, Claire M. Renzetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research suggests that the relationship between alcohol use and intimate partner violence (IPV) is moderated by a range of other factors. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between alcohol use, hostile sexism, and religious self-regulation with perpetration. Using a national sample of 255 men, we found that hostile sexism was associated with physical violence toward a partner and alcohol use was positively associated with psychological abuse toward a partner. With regard to religious self-regulation, we found that introjected religious self-regulation was positively associated with hostile sexism and positively associated with perpetrating physical IPV. Identified religious self-regulation was negatively associated with physical violence perpetration. We also found significant interactions among our independent measures on physical IPV perpetration. These analyses suggest that increased alcohol consumption elevates the risk for physical violence perpetration among men who are high in introjected religious self-regulation and low in hostile sexism, while reducing the risk for perpetration in men who are high in identified religious self-regulation and low in hostile sexism. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3237-3263
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume35
Issue number17-18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2017.

Keywords

  • alcohol and drugs
  • batterers
  • domestic violence
  • domestic violence
  • spirituality and violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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