Alleviating effects of Si-Ni-San, a traditional Chinese prescription, on experimental liver injury and its mechanisms

Jieyun Jiang, Chunxiang Zhou, Qiang Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study aims at examining the effects of Si-Ni-San, a prescription usually used for treating hepatitis in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on various experimental liver injury models and its mechanisms. The prescription showed significant hepatoprotection against CCl4-induced hepatic damage, both in vivo and in vitro. To the liver injury induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Si-Ni-San also provided significant alleviation through enhancing nitric oxide (NO) release by macrophages. Against the liver injury induced by a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to picryl chloride (PCl-DTH), Si-Ni-San alleviated it remarkably when administered during either the induction or effector phase. A significant reduction of in-vitro hepatotoxicity, as measured by the inhibition of serum transaminase evaluation, was observed in non-parenchymal cells from liver-injured mice treated with Si-Ni-San. Si-Ni-San facilitated apoptosis in non-parenchymal cells from liver-injured mice, as well as in spleen cells activated by PCl in vivo or by Con A in vitro. These results suggest that Si-Ni-San provides alleviating effects against liver injury through multiple mechanisms, including protection of the hepatocyte membrane, enhancement of NO release, and dysfunction of liver-infiltrating cells mainly through causing their apoptosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1089-1094
Number of pages6
JournalBiological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2003

Keywords

  • Alleviating effect
  • Apoptosis
  • Experimental liver injury
  • Hepatocyte membrane
  • Nitric oxide
  • Si-Ni-San

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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