Alternative polyadenylation and salicylic acid modulate root responses to low nitrogen availability

Carlos M. Conesa, Angela Saez, Sara Navarro-Neila, Laura de Lorenzo, Arthur G. Hunt, Edgar B. Sepúlveda, Roberto Baigorri, Jose M. Garcia-Mina, Angel M. Zamarreño, Soledad Sacristán, Juan C. Del Pozo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nitrogen (N) is probably the most important macronutrient and its scarcity limits plant growth, development and fitness. N starvation response has been largely studied by transcriptomic analyses, but little is known about the role of alternative polyadenylation (APA) in such response. In this work, we show that N starvation modifies poly(A) usage in a large number of transcripts, some of them mediated by FIP1, a component of the polyadenylation machinery. Interestingly, the number of mRNAs isoforms with poly(A) tags located in protein-coding regions or 5-UTRs significantly increases in response to N starvation. The set of genes affected by APA in response to N deficiency is enriched in N-metabolism, oxidation-reduction processes, response to stresses, and hormone responses, among others. A hormone profile analysis shows that the levels of salicylic acid (SA), a phytohormone that reduces nitrate accumulation and root growth, increase significantly upon N starvation. Meta-analyses of APA-affected and fip1-2-deregulated genes indicate a connection between the nitrogen starvation response and salicylic acid (SA) signaling. Genetic analyses show that SA may be important for preventing the overgrowth of the root system in low N environments. This work provides new insights on how plants interconnect different pathways, such as defense-related hormonal signaling and the regulation of genomic information by APA, to fine-tune the response to low N availability.

Original languageEnglish
Article number251
JournalPlants
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research was supported by grants from the Spanish Government BIO2017-82209-R, and BIO2014-52091-R to J.C.P. and by the “Severo Ochoa Program for Centres of Excellence in R&D” from the Agencia Estatal de Investigación of Spain (grant SEV-2016-0672 (2017-2021) to the CBGP. CMC by a predoctoral fellowship (BES-2017-082152) associated to the Severo Ochoa Program. AS was supported by a Torres Quevedo grant (PTQ-15-07915) from MINECO (Spain). Acknowledgments: We thank Antonio Molina and Miguel A. Torres for NahG lines and pad4-1 and sid2-2 mutant. We also thank the greenhouse service from CBGP for assistance. The raw data for this study may be found at NCBI SRA (https://submit.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/subs/sra/) under SRA bioproject number PRJNA528753.

Funding Information:
Funding: Research was supported by grants from the Spanish Government BIO2017-82209-R, and BIO2014-52091-R to J.C.P. and by the “Severo Ochoa Program for Centres of Excellence in R&D” from the Agencia Estatal de Investigación of Spain (grant SEV-2016-0672 (2017-2021) to the CBGP. CMC by a predoctoral fellowship (BES-2017-082152) associated to the Severo Ochoa Program. AS was supported by a Torres Quevedo grant (PTQ-15-07915) from MINECO (Spain).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Alternative polyadenylation
  • Nitrogen starvation
  • Root development
  • Salicylic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Plant Science

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