An aircraft design competition for high school STEM improvement

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The educational benefits of aerospace design-build-fly competitions are well known for engineering students at the college level. Moreover, participation in these competitions has increased over the last decade. We describe a high-school-level wing design competition, which is adapted from college-level competitions and provides students with a valuable learning, teamwork, and hands-on building experience. This paper presents the process and results of a high-school completion, which is adapted from university-level aircraft design competitions. In this high-school competition, the students are tasked with designing and prototyping a wing for a stock airframe. The student-designed wings are scored through design reports and a flight competition. Preliminary analysis of student EXPLORE, PLAN, and ACT scores and qualitative evidence suggest improved educational outcomes from participating in the wing-design competition.

Original languageEnglish
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event55th AIAA/ASMe/ASCE/AHS/SC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference - SciTech Forum and Exposition 2014 - National Harbor, MD, United States
Duration: Jan 13 2014Jan 17 2014

Conference

Conference55th AIAA/ASMe/ASCE/AHS/SC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference - SciTech Forum and Exposition 2014
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNational Harbor, MD
Period1/13/141/17/14

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors appreciate support for the Kentucky Wing Design Competition which was provided by the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium under NASA Grant NXX10AL96H, and partners RJ Corman Aviation Services, Lake Cumberland Regional Airport, Stantec, the University of Kentucky College of Engineering, the Institute for Aerospace Education, and the University of Kentucky Vis Center.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Building and Construction
  • Architecture

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An aircraft design competition for high school STEM improvement'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this