An Assessment of the Feasibility and Utility of an ACCC-ASCO Implicit Bias Training Program to Enhance Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Cancer Clinical Trials

Nadine J. Barrett, Leigh Boehmer, Janelle Schrag, Al B. Benson, Sybil Green, Leila Hamroun-Yazid, Alexandra Howson, Khalid Matin, Randall A. Oyer, Lori Pierce, Sanford E. Jeames, Karen Winkfield, Eddy S. Yang, Victoria Zwicker, Suanna Bruinooge, Patricia Hurley, Jen Hanley Williams, Carmen E. Guerra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE:Cancer trial participants do not reflect the racial and ethnic diversity in the population of people with cancer in the United States. As a result of multiple system-, patient-, and provider-level factors, including implicit bias, cancer clinical trials are not consistently offered to all potentially eligible patients.MATERIALS AND METHODS:ASCO and ACCC evaluated the utility (pre- and post-test knowledge changes) and feasibility (completion rates, curriculum satisfaction metrics, survey questions, and interviews) of a customized online training program combined with facilitated peer-to-peer discussion designed to help research teams identify their own implicit biases and develop strategies to mitigate them. Discussion focused on (1) specific elements of the training modules; (2) how to apply lessons learned; and (3) key considerations for developing a facilitation guide to support peer-to-peer discussions in cancer clinical research settings. We evaluated discussion via a qualitative assessment.RESULTS:Participant completion rate was high: 49 of 50 participating cancer programs completed training; 126 of 129 participating individuals completed the training (98% response rate); and 119 completed the training and evaluations (92% response rate). Training increased the mean percentage change in knowledge scores by 19%-45% across key concepts (eg, causes of health disparities) and increased the mean percentage change in knowledge scores by 10%-31% about strategies/actions to address implicit bias and diversity concerns in cancer clinical trials. Knowledge increases were sustained at 6 weeks. Qualitative evaluation validated the utility and feasibility of facilitated peer-to-peer discussion.CONCLUSION:The pilot implementation of the training program demonstrated excellent utility and feasibility. Our evaluation affirms that an online training designed to raise awareness about implicit bias and develop strategies to mitigate biases among cancer research teams is feasible and can be readily implemented in cancer research settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E570-E580
JournalJCO Oncology Practice
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© American Society of Clinical Oncology.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Health Policy
  • Oncology(nursing)

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