An exploratory study of indicators of recent nonmedical prescription stimulant use among college students

Charles Ashley Warnock, Carolyn L. Lauckner, Lucy A. Ingram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To explore the relationship between past 30-day nonmedical prescription stimulant use (NPSU) and past 30-day marijuana and/or alcohol use, past 30-day risky marijuana and/or alcohol use, student demographics, and student activity involvement among college students. Participants: Sample of 604 college-aged students at two large universities in the southeastern U.S. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was completed electronically. Logistic regression was used to identify and test covariates of past 30-day NPSU. Results: Over 20% of participants self-reported past NPSU. Using both marijuana and alcohol in the past 30 days (B = 3.293, p =.002, OR= 26.91, 95% CI OR= 3.42, 211.92) and engaging in both risky marijuana and alcohol use (B = 2.095, p <.001, OR = 8.13, 95% CI OR = 2.52, 25.17) were significantly related to past 30-day NPSU. Conclusions: NPSU may be indicative of broader polysubstance use problems among college-aged students.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Alcohol use
  • Nonmedical prescription stimulant use
  • college students
  • marijuana use
  • polysubstance use
  • prescription stimulant misuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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