Anger Rumination as a Mediator of the Relationship Between Mindfulness and Aggression: The Utility of a Multidimensional Mindfulness Model

Jessica R. Peters, Laura M. Smart, Tory A. Eisenlohr-Moul, Paul J. Geiger, Gregory T. Smith, Ruth A. Baer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Mindfulness training reduces anger and aggression, but the mechanisms of these effects are unclear. Mindfulness may reduce anger expression and hostility via reductions in anger rumination, a process of thinking repetitively about angry episodes that increases anger. Previous research supports this theory but used measures of general rumination and assessed only the present-centered awareness component of mindfulness. The present study investigated associations between various aspects of mindfulness, anger rumination, and components of aggression. Method: The present study used self-report measures of these constructs in a cross-sectional sample of 823 students. Results: Structural equation modeling revealed that anger rumination accounts for a significant component of the relationship between mindfulness and aggression, with the largest effect sizes demonstrated for the nonjudgment of inner experiences facet of mindfulness. Conclusion: Nonjudgment and present-centered awareness may influence aggression via reduced anger rumination. The importance of examining mindfulness as a multidimensional construct is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)871-884
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume71
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Anger
  • Mindfulness
  • Rumination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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