Antecedents and Consequences of Discrepant Perceptions of Racial Socialization between Parents and Adolescents within Mexican-Origin Families

Shanting Chen, Elizabeth Jelsma, Yang Hou, Aprile Benner, Su Yeong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parents and adolescents often have different views regarding parental racial socialization practices; however, studies documenting such discrepancies remain scarce. Using a person-centered approach, this study investigated patterns of parent–adolescent discrepant views on racial socialization (i.e., cultural socialization, bias coping, bias awareness) as well as antecedents and consequences of the discrepancy profiles. Participants were 604 adolescents (54% female, Mage= 12.41, Rangeage = 11–15) and their mothers and fathers. The results showed distinct discrepancy patterns and suggested that more maternal/paternal warmth was associated with profiles that have smaller discrepancies or profiles in which adolescents reported higher socialization than parents. Adolescents who reported higher or similar socialization as parents demonstrated better adjustment. Implications for interventions aimed at strengthening parent–child relationships and communication about race and culture are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2412-2426
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume50
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Adolescent well-being
  • Discrepancy between parent and adolescents
  • Mexican-origin families
  • Parental racial socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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