Antioxidant and emulsifying properties of alcalase-hydrolyzed potato proteins in meat emulsions with different fat concentrations

Gema Nieto, Manuel Castillo, Youling L. Xiong, Daniel Álvarez, Fred A. Payne, María Dolores Garrido

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of hydrolyzed potato protein (HPP), a natural antioxidant, on emulsion quality was investigated using a factorial design with two Fat (15%, 30%) and two HPP (0%, 2.5%) levels, with three replications. The colour of the raw emulsions as well as cooking losses, textural properties and TBARS of cooked frankfurters were measured. Increasing the Fat proportion significantly (P < 0.05) increased L*, Hab0 and decreased a*, b*, Cab* and hardness. Meat emulsions with added HPP were darker (lower L*) than those made without HPP and also had lower values of a* and b*. The addition of HPP (2.5%) significantly (P < 0.05) decreased cooking losses and fracture force, and had a significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect on lipid oxidation in cooked frankfurters. These results suggest that HPP has both antioxidant and emulsifying properties which may be of potential use in meat emulsion manufacturing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-30
Number of pages7
JournalMeat Science
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors wish to thank the University of Murcia (Spain) and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (University of Kentucky, USA) for the financial support for this research, and the Departments of Animal and Food Sciences and Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (University of Kentucky) for allowing the use of their facilities. We also thank Dr. Lynn Wang for preparing the HPP samples.

Keywords

  • Colour
  • Cooking losses
  • Emulsion stability
  • Frankfurters
  • Gel strength
  • Lipid oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Antioxidant and emulsifying properties of alcalase-hydrolyzed potato proteins in meat emulsions with different fat concentrations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this