Antisense oligonucleotide targeting hepatic Serum Amyloid A limits the progression of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

Preetha Shridas, Ailing Ji, Andrea C. Trumbauer, Victoria P. Noffsinger, Luke W. Meredith, Frederick C. de Beer, Adam E. Mullick, Nancy Webb, Dennis G. Karounos, Lisa R. Tannock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and aims: Obesity increases the risk for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in humans and enhances angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AAA formation in C57BL/6 mice. We reported that deficiency of Serum Amyloid A (SAA) significantly reduces AngII-induced inflammation and AAA in both hyperlipidemic apoE-deficient and obese C57BL/6 mice. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SAA plays a role in the progression of early AAA in obese C57BL/6 mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% kcal as fat) throughout the study. After 4 months of diet, the mice were infused with AngII until the end of the study. Mice with at least a 25% increase in the luminal diameter of the abdominal aorta after 4 weeks of AngII infusion were stratified into 2 groups. The first group received a control antisense oligonucleotide (Ctr ASO), and the second group received ASO that suppresses SAA (SAA-ASO) until the end of the study. Results: Plasma SAA levels were significantly reduced by the SAA ASO treatment. While mice that received the control ASO had continued aortic dilation throughout the AngII infusion periods, the mice that received SAA-ASO had a significant reduction in the progression of aortic dilation, which was associated with significant reductions in matrix metalloprotease activities, decreased macrophage infiltration and decreased elastin breaks in the abdominal aortas. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that suppression of SAA protects obese C57BL/6 mice from the progression of AngII-induced AAA. Suppression of SAA may be a therapeutic approach to limit AAA progression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number117492
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume391
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Authors

Keywords

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
  • Antisense oligonucleotide
  • Serum amyloid A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Antisense oligonucleotide targeting hepatic Serum Amyloid A limits the progression of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this