Applying behavioral and social science theory to HIV prevention: The need for structural- level approaches

Richard A. Crosby, Ralph J. DiClemente

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Set in the context of high-impact prevention, this chapter provides a brief historical account of how theory application to HIV prevention has evolved from individual-level models to structural-level approaches. The chapter describes the value and limitations of applying behavioral science and social science theories to the pandemic and describes several models and theory-based approaches. It then proceeds to identify emerging, structural-level approaches to achieving population-level HIV prevention in developing and developed countries. The chapter distinguishes structural-level interventions from multilevel interventions, and it describes strengths and weaknesses of structural-level approaches to achieving high-impact prevention. In so doing, several critical principles of structural-level approaches are identified.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStructural Interventions for HIV Prevention
Subtitle of host publicationOptimizing Strategies for Reducing New Infections and Improving Care
Pages13-30
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9780190675486
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Oxford University Press 2019. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Behavioral theory
  • HIV
  • Population-level approaches
  • Social science theory
  • Structural-level approaches

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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