Arguing the case for the autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid-lipid phosphate phosphatase 3-signaling nexus in the development and complications of atherosclerosis

Susan S. Smyth, Paul Mueller, Fanmuyi Yang, J. Anthony Brandon, Andrew J. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

The structurally simple glycero- and sphingo-phospholipids, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate, serve as important receptor-active mediators that influence blood and vascular cell function and are positioned to influence the events that contribute to the progression and complications of atherosclerosis. Growing evidence from preclinical animal models has implicated LPA, LPA receptors, and key enzymes involved in LPA metabolism in pathophysiologic events that may underlie atherosclerotic vascular disease. These observations are supported by genetic analysis in humans implicating a lipid phosphate phosphatase as a novel risk factor for coronary artery disease. In this review, we summarize current understanding of LPA production, metabolism, and signaling as may be relevant for atherosclerotic and other vascular disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Lipid phosphate phosphatase
  • Lysophosphatidic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Arguing the case for the autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid-lipid phosphate phosphatase 3-signaling nexus in the development and complications of atherosclerosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this