Association between commercial vehicle driver at-fault crashes involving sleepiness/fatigue and proximity to rest areas and truck stops

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: There is ongoing concern at the national level about the availability of adequate commercial vehicle rest areas and truck stops for commercial vehicle drivers to rest or to wait for a delivery window. Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted to determine the association between the occurrence of sleepiness/fatigue-related (cases) vs. all other human factor-related commercial vehicle driver at-fault crashes (controls) and proximity to rest areas, weigh stations with rest havens, and truck stops. Results: Commercial vehicle driver at-fault crashes involving sleepiness/fatigue were more likely to occur on roadways where the nearest rest areas/weigh stations with rest havens/truck stops were located 20 miles or more from the commercial vehicle crash site (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.32; Confidence Interval [CI] 1.615, 3.335] for 20–39.9 miles vs. <20 miles; and OR = 6.788 [CI 2.112, 21.812] for 40+ miles) compared to commercial vehicle at-fault driver crashes with human factors other than sleepiness/fatigue cited in crash reports. Commercial vehicle driver at-fault crashes involving sleepiness/fatigue also were more likely to occur on parkways compared to interstates (adjusted OR = 3.747 [CI 2.83, 4.95]), during nighttime hours (adjusted OR = 6.199 [CI 4.733, 8.119]), and on dry pavement (adjusted OR 1.909, [CI 1.373, 2.655]). Conclusions: The use of statewide crash data analysis coupled with ArcGIS mapping capabilities provided the opportunity to both statistically determine and to visualize the association between rest area/weigh station with rest haven/truck stop distance and the occurrence of commercial vehicle driver at-fault crashes involving sleepiness/fatigue. Implementation and evaluation of commercial vehicle employer policies and interventions such as the use of commercial vehicle driver fatigue alert systems may help to reduce fatigue and sleepiness in commercial vehicle drivers. These results can be used by state and local highway transportation officials to inform and increase truck parking availability, especially on parkways.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-9
Number of pages7
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume126
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • ArcGIS
  • Commercial vehicles
  • Crash
  • Driver
  • Rest areas
  • Sleepiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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