Association between regular aspirin use and circulating markers of inflammation: A study within the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial

Krystle A.Lang Kuhs, Allan Hildesheim, Britton Trabert, Troy J. Kemp, Mark P. Purdue, Nicolas Wentzensen, Hormuzd A. Katki, Ligia A. Pinto, Erikka Loftfield, Mahboobeh Safaeian, Anil K. Chaturvedi, Meredith S. Shiels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Regular aspirin use may decrease cancer risk by reducing chronic inflammation. However, associations between aspirin use and circulating markers of inflammation have not been well studied. Methods: Serum levels of 78 inflammatory markers were measured in 1,819 55- to 74-year-old men and women in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Data were combined from three completed case-control studies and reweighted to the PLCO screening arm. Self-reported aspirin and ibuprofen use (number of tablets taken per day/week/month) over the previous 12 months was collected at baseline. Associations between (i) nonregular (<4 tablets/month), (ii) low (1-4 tablets/week), (iii) moderate (1 tablet/day), or (iv) high (2+ tablets/day) regular aspirin or ibuprofen use and marker levels were assessed with weighted logistic regression. Results: Aspirin use was nominally associated with (Ptrendacross categories ≤ 0.05) decreased levels of chemokine C-C motif ligand 15 [CCL15; OR, 0.5; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.3-0.8; moderate versus nonregular use]; soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sVEGFR2; OR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.4-1.0); soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1; OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) and increased levels of CCL13 (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.8-2.1); CCL17 (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.7-1.9) and interleukin 4 (IL4; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.8). Trends were not statistically significant following correction for multiple comparisons. Likewise, no statistically significant associations were observed between ibuprofen use and marker levels. Conclusions: No significant associations were observed between regular aspirin use and the inflammatory markers assessed. Impact: Additional studies are needed to better understand the relationship between aspirin use, chronic inflammation, and cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)825-832
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 AACR.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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