Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and odds of breast cancer by molecular subtype: analysis of the MEND study

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3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Breast cancer (BC) in Nigeria is characterized by disproportionately aggressive molecular subtypes. C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with risk and aggressiveness for several types of cancer. We examined the association of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) with odds of BC by molecular subtype among Nigerian women. Among 296 newly diagnosed BC cases and 259 healthy controls, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between hsCRP and odds of BC overall and by molecular subtype (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched and triple-negative or TNBC). High hsCRP (> 3 mg/L) was observed in 57% of cases and 31% of controls and was associated with 4 times the odds of BC (aOR: 4.43; 95% CI: 2.56, 7.66) after adjusting for socio-demographic, reproductive, and clinical variables. This association persisted regardless of menopausal status and body mass index (BMI) category. High hsCRP was associated with increased odds of TNBC (aOR: 3.32; 95% CI: 1.07, 10.35), luminal A BC (aOR: 4.03; 95% CI: 1.29, 12.64), and HER2-enriched BC (aOR: 6.27; 95% CI: 1.69, 23.25). Future studies are necessary in this population to further evaluate a potential role for CRP as a predictive biomarker for BC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1230-1242
Number of pages13
JournalOncotarget
Volume12
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 22 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Fogarty International Center, grant number K01TW010271 (T.A.) and National Institutes of Health, grant number NIH 1P30DK124723-01.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright: © 2021 Gupta et al.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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