Barriers and pathways to diffusion of methamphetamine use among African Americans in the Rural South: Preliminary ethnographic findings

Rocky L. Sexton, Robert G. Carlson, Harvey A. Siegal, Russel S. Falck, Carl Leukefeld, Brenda Booth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

There are no studies of African Americans', methamphetamine use in the South where it is widespread among whites. We describe factors that inhibit or facilitate the diffusion of methamphetamine use among African Americans based on qualitative interviews with 86 drug users in rural Arkansas and Kentucky. Results suggest low prevalence of methamphetamine use among African Americans, and interviewees cited several barriers to its diffusion which were linked to the drug's ingredients, psychoactive and physiological effects, difficulty in accessing distribution networks, and established African-American preference for cocaine. Fourteen African Americans reported methamphetamine use and discussed pathways to it. Possible increases in African-American methamphetamine use merits further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-103
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Project research is supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse Grant 1R01DA15363, Rural Stimulant Use and Mental Health: Services and Outcomes, Brenda Booth, Principal Investigator, Carl Leukefeld, and Harvey Siegal, Co-Principal Investigators.

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Diffusion
  • Ethnography
  • Methamphetamine
  • Rural drug use
  • Southern U.S.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

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