Basic science and public policy: Informed regulation for nicotine and tobacco products

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Scientific discoveries over the past few decades have provided significant insight into the abuse liability and negative health consequences associated with tobacco and nicotinecontaining products. While many of these advances have led to the development of policies and laws that regulate access to and formulations of these products, further research is critical to guide future regulatory efforts, especially as novel nicotine-containing products are introduced and selectively marketed to vulnerable populations. Discussion: In this narrative review, we provide an overview of the scientific findings that have impacted regulatory policy and discuss considerations for further translation of science into policy decisions. We propose that open, bidirectional communication between scientists and policy makers is essential to develop transformative preventive- and intervention-focused policies and programs to reduce appeal, abuse liability, and toxicity of the products. Conclusions: Through these types of interactions, collaborative efforts to inform and modify policy have the potential to significantly decrease the use of tobacco and alternative nicotine products and thus enhance health outcomes for individuals. Implications: This work addresses current topics in the nicotine and tobacco research field to emphasize the importance of basic science research and provide examples of how it can be utilized to inform public policy. In addition to relaying current thoughts on the topic from experts in the field, the article encourages continued efforts and communication between basic scientists and policy officials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)789-799
Number of pages11
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants: DA032543 and DA039658 (CDF), DA036569 (CDG), DA037897 and DA039393 (HDS), DA017949 (TJG), CA195124 (PTH), P50DA036105 and the Center for Tobacco Products of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (MID and DB), and DA03572, P50CA179546 and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (MDB). The content of this manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily reflect the official views of the NIH, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or the Society for Nicotine and Tobacco Research (SRNT).

Funding Information:
CDF and CDG contributed equally to this work as co-first authors. We'd like to thank Drs. Sara Hitchman (King's College London) and Andrea Villanti (Schroeder Institute at Truth Initiative), co-chairs of the SRNT Public Policy Network, for their extensive input and critical evaluation of the manuscript. We are also greatly appreciative for the input received from the members of the SRNT Board. Finally, we thank Dr. David Ashley, Director for the Office of Science at the FDA Center for Tobacco Products, for permission and input with the modified figures based on his presentation in May of 2015 at the Tobacco Merchants Association, Williamsburg, VA. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants: DA032543 and DA039658 (CDF), DA036569 (CDG), DA037897 and DA039393 (HDS), DA017949 (TJG), CA195124 (PTH), P50DA036105 and the Center for Tobacco Products of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (MID and DB), and DA03572, P50CA179546 and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (MDB). The content of this manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily reflect the official views of the NIH, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or the Society for Nicotine and Tobacco Research (SRNT).

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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