Behavioral contingencies and d-amphetamine effects on human aggressive and non-aggressive responding

D. R. Cherek, T. H. Kelly, J. L. Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Animal studies have reported biphasic effects of d-amphetamine on aggressive behavior, with low doses increasing and high doses decreasing aggressive behavior. Consumption of high doses of d-amphetamine has been consistently linked with the occurrence of human aggressive behavior. This study examined the effects of low doses of d-amphetamine on human aggressive responding maintained at different rates by either avoidance of or escape from scheduled provocations in a laboratory setting. D-amphetamine increased non-aggressive monetary reinforced responses in most subjects. Dose-response curves for aggressive responses were frequently biphasic with increases observed at 10mg/70kg doses and decreases observed at higher doses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-189
Number of pages6
JournalNIDA Research Monograph Series
VolumeNO. 67
StatePublished - 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Behavioral contingencies and d-amphetamine effects on human aggressive and non-aggressive responding'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this