Beliefs about savoring in older adulthood: Aging and perceived health affect temporal components of perceived savoring ability

Paul J. Geiger, Jennifer N. Morey, Suzanne C. Segerstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to savor positive life events is associated with higher emotional well-being; however, few studies have examined savoring ability in older adults. The present study used a longitudinal design to examine changes in perceived savoring abilities and associations with perceived health in older adulthood. Older adults (N = 131) reported on beliefs about savoring and perceived health at baseline and 2 1/2 years later. Perceived anticipation (savoring the future) and reminiscing (savoring the past) abilities declined from baseline to follow-up. Better perceived health at baseline predicted greater perceived reminiscing and anticipation abilities at follow-up. Greater perceived ability to savor the present moment at baseline predicted better perceived health at follow-up. Aging and poorer health focus older adults' thoughts on present-moment pleasures, which may benefit health, but may also lead to reductions in perceived anticipation and reminiscing abilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164-169
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Affect regulation
  • Aging
  • Perceived health
  • Savoring beliefs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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