Beliefs Underlying Colorectal Cancer Information Seeking Among Young Black Adults: a Reasoned Action Approach Elicitation Study

Anita Silwal, Carina M. Zelaya, Diane B. Francis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Colorectal cancer in younger adults is more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage. Furthermore, younger Black adults are more likely to be diagnosed with and die from colorectal cancer than younger White adults. Given these persistent racial disparities, urgent attention is needed to increase colorectal cancer awareness and information seeking among young Black adults. Guided by the reasoned action approach, the purpose of this study was to identify behavioral, normative, and control beliefs that influence general colorectal cancer information seeking, talking to a healthcare provider about colorectal cancer, and talking to family about cancer history. The sample included N = 194 participants; Mage = 28.00 (SD = 5.48). Thirty-one percent had ever searched for colorectal cancer information. We identified salient educational advantages to seeking information about colorectal cancer and talking to healthcare providers and family members about cancer history. Barriers included fear, misinformation, low priority, inaccessibility of information, and lack of interest or willingness. This is one of the few studies to investigate cancer communication behaviors among young Black adults. The findings can inform interventions to motivate engagement in cancer communication behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was aided by grant #IRG 16–182-28 from the American Cancer Society.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education.

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Cancer information seeking
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Health communication
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Beliefs Underlying Colorectal Cancer Information Seeking Among Young Black Adults: a Reasoned Action Approach Elicitation Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this