Beneficial reuse of industrial CO2 emissions using a microalgae photobioreactor: Waste heat utilization assessment

Daniel T. Mohler, Michael H. Wilson, Zhen Fan, John G. Groppo, Mark Crocker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microalgae are a potential means of recycling CO2 from industrial point sources. With this in mind, a novel photobioreactor (PBR) was designed and deployed at a coal-fired power plant. To ascertain the feasibility of using waste heat from the power plant to heat algae cultures during cold periods, two heat transfer models were constructed to quantify PBR cooling times. The first, which was based on tabulated data, material properties and the physical orientation of the PBR tubes, yielded a range of heat transfer coefficients of 19–64 W m−2 K−1 for the PBR at wind speeds of 1–10 m s−1. The second model was based on data collected from the PBR and gave an overall heat transfer coefficient of 24.8 W m−2 K−1. Energy penalties associated with waste heat utilization were found to incur an 18%–103% increase in energy consumption, resulting in a 22%–70% reduction in CO2 capture for the scenarios considered. A techno-economic analysis showed that the cost of heat integration equipment increased capital expenditures (CAPEX) by a factor of nine and increased biomass production costs by a factor of three. Although the scenario is thermodynamically feasible, the increase in CAPEX incurs an increase in biomass production cost that is economically untenable.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2634
JournalEnergies
Volume12
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy (award no. DE-FE0026396), the Kentucky Department of Energy Development and Independence, Duke Energy, and the University of Kentucky. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof.

Funding Information:
Funding: This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy (award no. DE-FE0026396), the Kentucky Department of Energy Development and Independence, Duke Energy, and the University of Kentucky. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 by the authors.

Keywords

  • Algae
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Flue gas
  • Photobioreactor
  • Power plant
  • Utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Energy (miscellaneous)
  • Control and Optimization
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Beneficial reuse of industrial CO2 emissions using a microalgae photobioreactor: Waste heat utilization assessment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this