Binge drinking in African American males from adolescence to young adulthood: The protective influence of religiosity, family connectedness, and close friends' substance use

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31 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the contribution of culturally relevant protective factors (i.e., adolescent religiosity, family connectedness, and perceived close friends' substance use) to the probability of young adult binge drinking among African American males. Participants (n = 1,599) drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were high school age adolescents (14-18 years, M = 16) at Wave 1 and young adults (18-26, M = 22) at Wave 3. Adolescent binge drinking was associated with all three protective factors. Perceived close friends' substance use in adolescence was a protective factor in later binge drinking during young adulthood, and was moderated by age such that the effect was stronger for younger adolescents. Implications for culturally relevant research and prevention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1435-1451
Number of pages17
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume45
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
4This study uses data from the Add Health project, a program designed by J. Richard Udry, Ph.D. (principal investigator), and Peter Bearman, Ph.D., and funded by grant P01-HD31921 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) with cooperative funding from 17 other agencies. Persons interested in obtaining data files from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health should contact Add Health, Carolina Population Center, 123 W. Franklin St., Chapel Hill, NC 27516–2524 (http://222.cpc.unc.edu/addhealth). Data collection for Wave III was conducted by the Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Copyright:
Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African American
  • Binge drinking
  • Close friendships
  • Family connectedness
  • Male
  • Peers
  • Religiosity
  • Young adulthood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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