Blinded to science: Gender differences in the effects of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on academic and science attitudes among sixth graders

Brea L. Perry, Tanja Link, Christina Boelter, Carl Leukefeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little research has examined whether the effects of race or socioeconomic status (SES) on educational attitudes differ by gender, limiting knowledge of unique vulnerabilities occurring at the intersection of multiple social statuses. Using data from 182 sixth-graders, interactions between gender, race/ethnicity, and SES in predicting educational aspirations, persistence, views of science, and educational self-efficacy are examined. African American and Latino boys express more negative attitudes relative to (1) higher-SES boys, (2) White boys, and (3) girls of any race/ethnicity or level of SES. The intersection of multiple inequalities in education across the early life course is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-743
Number of pages19
JournalGender and Education
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by a National Center for Research Resources Science Education Partnership Award (R25 RR023304; PI Leukefeld).

Keywords

  • boys
  • girls
  • race and ethnicities
  • social class
  • social theory
  • sociology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Education

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