Case study: A social marketing approach for increasing community coalitions’ adoption of evidence-based policy

Alyssa B. Mayer, R. Craig Lefebvre, Robert J. McDermott, Carol A. Bryant, Anita H. Courtney, James H. Lindenberger, Mark A. Swanson, Anthony D. Panzera, Mahmooda Khaliq, Brian J. Biroscak, Ashton P. Wright

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Community-Based Prevention Marketing (CBPM) for Policy Development is a unique blend of current streams of thought and action in public health that is responsive to calls for upstream social marketing strategies. It employs a social ecological perspective on change, uses an evidence-based and upstream approach to mobilize people into strategically focused actions, and applies social marketing principles to tailor relevant and feasible policy development at appropriate levels. This model builds upon and extends a number of strands of research in prevention, policy development and evaluation, and coalition action for policy implementation that complements work being done by universities, their community partners, and other research and community groups that are concerned with stemming the rise of obesity and other ‘wicked’ health problems. The results of the pilot test are described and have been incorporated into the development of a web-based training site to help coalitions and their research partners adopt CBPM-Policy Development to address their public health problems. However, not every coalition is ready to engage in CBPM-Policy Development. This process requires a well-functioning coalition, a strong leader, and access to marketing research experts.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Marketing and Behaviour Change
Subtitle of host publicationModels, Theory and Applications
Pages317-327
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781782548157
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Linda Brennan, Wayne Binney, Lukas Parker, Torgeir Aleti and Dang Nguyen 2014.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting (all)

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