Central nervous systems trauma and stroke. I. Biochemical considerations for oxygen radical formation and lipid peroxidation

J. Mark Braughler, Edward D. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

604 Scopus citations

Abstract

The generation of oxygen radicals and the process of lipid perodixation have become a focus of attention for investigators in the fields of central nervous system (CNS) trauma and stroke (e.g., ischemia). Considering our level of understanding of free radical and lipid peroxidation chemistry, absolute proof for their involvement in the pathophysiology of traumatic and ischemic damage to the CNS has been meager. While direct, unequivocal evidence for the participation of free radicals and lipid peroxidation as primary contributors to the death of neuronal tissue waits to be established, numerous recent studies have provided considerable support for the occurrence of free radical and lipid peroxidation reactions in the injured or ischemic CNS. In addition, the pharmacological use of antioxidants and free radical scavengers in the treatment of experimental CNS trauma and ischemia has provided convincing, although indirect evidence, for the involvement of oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation in these conditions. The intent of this and its companion paper is to review: 1) the biochemical processes which may give rise to free radical reactions in the CNS, 2) the environment of the ischemic cells as it may affect the generation of oxygen radicals and the catalysis of lipid peroxidation reactions, 3) the evidence for the involvement of free radical mechanisms in CNS trauma and ischemia, and 4) the pathophysiological consequences of these phenomena.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-301
Number of pages13
JournalFree Radical Biology and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Keywords

  • Free radical
  • Ischemia
  • Lipid peroxidation
  • Oxygen radicals
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology (medical)

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