Cerebral amyloid angiopathy in Down syndrome and sporadic and autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease

María Carmona-Iragui, Mircea Balasa, Bessy Benejam, Daniel Alcolea, Susana Fernández, Laura Videla, Isabel Sala, María Belén Sánchez-Saudinós, Estrella Morenas-Rodriguez, Roser Ribosa-Nogué, Ignacio Illán-Gala, Sofía Gonzalez-Ortiz, Jordi Clarimón, Frederick Schmitt, David K. Powell, Beatriz Bosch, Albert Lladó, Michael S. Rafii, Elizabeth Head, José Luis MolinuevoRafael Blesa, Sebastián Videla, Alberto Lleó, Raquel Sánchez-Valle, Juan Fortea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Introduction We aimed to investigate if cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is more frequent in genetically determined than in sporadic early-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (early-onset AD [EOAD]). Methods Neuroimaging features of CAA, apolipoprotein (APOE), and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid β (Aβ) 40 levels were studied in subjects with Down syndrome (DS, n = 117), autosomal-dominant AD (ADAD, n = 29), sporadic EOAD (n = 42), and healthy controls (n = 68). Results CAA was present in 31%, 38%, and 12% of cognitively impaired DS, symptomatic ADAD, and sporadic EOAD subjects and in 13% and 4% of cognitively unimpaired DS individuals and healthy controls, respectively. APOE ε4 genotype was borderline significantly associated with CAA in sporadic EOAD (P =.06) but not with DS or ADAD. There were no differences in Aβ040 levels between groups or between subjects with and without CAA. Discussion CAA is more frequently found in genetically determined AD than in sporadic EOAD. Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ40 levels are not a useful biomarker for CAA in AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1251-1260
Number of pages10
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 the Alzheimer's Association

Keywords

  • Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy
  • Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers
  • Down syndrome
  • Neuroimaging
  • Sporadic early-onset Alzheimer's disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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