Chicken manure enhanced yield and quality of field-grown kale and collard greens

George F. Antonious, Eric T. Turley, Regina R. Hill, John C. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Organic matter and nutrients in municipal sewage sludge (SS) and chicken manure (CM) could be recycled and used for land farming to enhance fertility and physical properties of soils. Three soil management practices were used at Kentucky State University Research Farm, Franklin County, to study the impact of soil amendments on kale (Brassica oleracea cv. Winterbar) and collard (Brassica oleracea cv. Top Bunch) yields and quality. The three soil management practices were: (i) SS mixed with native soil at 15 t acre-1, (ii) CM mixed with native soil at 15 t acre-1, and (iii) no-mulch (NM) native soil for comparison purposes. At harvest, collard and kale green plants were graded according to USDA standards. Plants grown in CM and SS amended soil produced the greatest number of U.S. No. 1 grade of collard and kale greens compared to NM native soil. Across all treatments, concentrations of ascorbic acid and phenols were generally greater in kale than in collards. Overall, CM and SS enhanced total phenols and ascorbic acid contents of kale and collard compared to NM native soil. We investigated the chemical and physical properties of each of the three soil treatments that might explain variability among treatments and the impact of soil amendments on yield, phenols, and ascorbic acid contents of kale and collard green grown under this practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health - Part B Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This investigation was supported by a grant from USDA/NIFA to Kentucky State University under agreement No. KYX 10-13-48P.

Keywords

  • Brassica oleracea
  • ascorbic acid
  • chicken manure
  • phenols
  • sewage sludge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Pollution

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