Co-Creating a Culturally Responsive Distance Education Cancer Course with, and for, Alaska’s Community Health Workers: Motivations from a Survey of Key Stakeholders

Katie Cueva, Laura Revels, Regina Kuhnley, Melany Cueva, Anne Lanier, Mark Dignan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

To gain input on a proposed culturally responsive, distance-delivered cancer education course informed by empowerment theory and adult-learning principles, Alaska’s Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) and CHA/P leadership were invited to take an online survey in February 2015. The proposed course will be developed as part of the “Distance Education to Engage Alaskan Community Health Aides in Cancer Control” project. The results of the survey demonstrate that respondents are both interested in taking the proposed class and engaging in course development. The results also indicate that respondents have the technological comfort and capacity to be engaged in online learning and have primarily positive experiences and perceptions of distance education. This survey is the beginning of the interactive development of the online cancer education course and part of a continuing endeavor to promote wellness with, and for, Alaska’s people by empowering Alaska’s CHA/Ps and inspiring positive behavioral change to both prevent cancer and support those who feel its burdens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)426-431
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Due to the increasing cancer rates and the impact of cancer within their communities, CHA/Ps have requested additional education about cancer. In response, the Community Health Aide Program cancer education project team developed and delivered in-person cancer and wellness classes throughout the last decade in Alaska’s CHA/P basic training centers (Anchorage, Nome, Bethel) [, ]. Unfortunately, Alaska’s geographic challenges (large distances, expensive airfare, and harsh weather patterns) restrict the amount of in-person cancer education that can be made available to CHA/Ps. However, increased internet access in rural Alaska has provided an opportunity to overcome these barriers. In response, a culturally relevant, distance-delivered, online course is being developed to allow CHA/Ps to receive timely, medically accurate, cancer education. The course is being developed as part of the “Distance Education to Engage Alaskan Community Health Aides in Cancer Control” project, supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R25CA186882. Formative evaluation to gain community input needed to develop this proposed course included inviting CHA/Ps and CHA/P leadership to complete an online survey in February 2015. This research protocol was reviewed and approved by the Alaska Area Institutional Review Board and the Southcentral Foundation (SCF) Executive Committee and the SCF Board of Directors. Additionally, this manuscript was reviewed and approved by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) Health Research Review Committee (HRRC) on behalf of the ANTHC Board of Directors and the SCF Executive Committee and the SCF Board of Directors.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, American Association for Cancer Education.

Keywords

  • Adult cancer education
  • Alaska Native
  • Cancer education survey
  • Cancer prevention
  • Community cancer education
  • Community health workers
  • Culturally respectful education
  • Culturally responsive education
  • Empowerment theory
  • Online learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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