Combination pharmacotherapies for stimulant use disorder: A review of clinical findings and recommendations for future research

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29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite concerted efforts to identify a pharmacotherapy for managing stimulant use disorders, no widely effective medications have been approved. Innovative strategies are necessary to develop successful pharmacotherapies for stimulant use disorders. This manuscript reviews human laboratory studies and clinical trials to determine whether one such strategy, use of combination pharmacotherapies, holds promise. The extant literature shows that combination pharmacotherapy produced results that were better than placebo treatment, especially with medications shown to have efficacy as monotherapies. However, many studies did not compare individual constituents to the combination treatment, making it impossible to determine whether combination treatment is more effective than monotherapy. Future research should systematically compare combined treatments with individual agents using medications showing some efficacy when tested alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-374
Number of pages12
JournalExpert Review of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Preparation of this manuscript was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01DA032254 and R01DA033394 to CRR). The authors have no other relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript apart from those disclosed.

Keywords

  • Amphetamine
  • Clinical trial
  • Cocaine
  • Human laboratory study
  • Pharmacotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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