Communication apprehension mediates the effects of past experience discussing substance use on child and adolescent psychiatrists’ self-efficacy

Kevin Wombacher, Nancy Grant Harrington, Allison M. Scott, Donald W. Helme, Catherine Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists (CAPs) treat patients who are at an increased risk of developing a substance use disorder in their lifetime. However, CAPs often experience apprehension when it comes to discussing substance use with their patients, and this apprehension may come from past experiences when these discussions have gone poorly. This study seeks to understand whether or not apprehension moderates the relationship between past experiences and self-efficacy for CAPs when discussing substance use with their patients. Methods This study used a national online survey of CAPs (n = 170) to test the extent to which apprehension mediated the relationship between past experiences discussing substance use and self-efficacy to do so. Results The results showed that past experience affects self-efficacy and apprehension serves as a mediator of this relationship. Conclusion This study helps to shed light on the determinants that influence providers’ perceptions of self-efficacy. Understanding what factors affect self-efficacy is important because these factors can then be targeted through training. Practice implications Patient-provider communication skills training for CAPs should happen early in their education so that they are less likely to become apprehensive about discussing substance use with their patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)651-655
Number of pages5
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume102
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Apprehension
  • Patient-provider communication
  • Self-efficacy
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (all)

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