Communication Quality Analysis: A User-friendly Observational Measure of Patient–Clinician Communication

Lauren Jodi Van Scoy, Allison M. Scott, Michael J. Green, Pamela D. Witt, Emily Wasserman, Vernon M. Chinchilli, Benjamin H. Levi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Communication Quality Analysis (CQA) is a rigorous transcript-based coding method for assessing clinical communication quality. We compared the resource-intensive transcript-based version with a streamlined real-time version of the method with respect to feasibility, validity, reliability, and association with traditional measures of communication quality. Simulated conversations between 108 trainees and 12 standardized patients were assessed by 7 coders using the two versions of CQA (transcript and real-time). Participants also completed two traditional communication quality assessment measures. Real-time CQA was feasible and yielded fair to excellent reliability, with some caveats that can be addressed in future work. CQA ratings were moderately correlated with traditional measures of communication quality, suggesting that CQA captures different aspects of communication quality than do traditional measures. Finally, CQA did not exhibit the ceiling effects observed in the traditional measures of communication quality. We conclude that real-time CQA is a user-friendly method for assessing communication quality that has the potential for broad application in training, research, and intervention contexts and may offer improvements to traditional, self-rated communication measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-235
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Methods and Measures
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the National Institute of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (R21NR017259). The authors would like to thank the Drs. Dennis Novack and Dr. Joseph Ballard for allow use of their standardized patient encounter scripts. We also thank Donald Bucher, DNP ACNP-BC, Deborah Halliday, MS, Jennifer Landis, BA and the Helen S. Breidegam School of Nursing at Moravian College. We are also grateful for additional CQA coders Richard Carter, MFA, A. Rosie Levi, Lauren Roberson, PhD, Sarah Sheff, PhD, Elizabeth Spencer, PhD, Symantha Webb, BA, and Carina Zelaya, MA. The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author, LJV, upon reasonable request.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research [R21NR017259]; National Institutes of Health [R21NR017259]. This work was funded by the National Institute of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (R21NR017259). The authors would like to thank the Drs. Dennis Novack and Dr. Joseph Ballard for allow use of their standardized patient encounter scripts. We also thank Donald Bucher, DNP ACNP-BC, Deborah Halliday, MS, Jennifer Landis, BA and the Helen S. Breidegam School of Nursing at Moravian College. We are also grateful for additional CQA coders Richard Carter, MFA, A. Rosie Levi, Lauren Roberson, PhD, Sarah Sheff, PhD, Elizabeth Spencer, PhD, Symantha Webb, BA, and Carina Zelaya, MA. The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author, LJV, upon reasonable request.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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