Communication training for scientists and engineers: A framework for highlighting principles common to written, oral, and visual communication

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Engineers and scientists need to be skilled in writing, speaking, and using visuals. This paper explores how instruction in communication can draw upon principles common across modes of communication. I first survey guidelines for the design of scholarly posters and categorize the types of advice they provide. Second, I use the categories of advice to develop a framework which highlights principles of communication common to written, oral, and visual communication. This framework should help instructors to (1) identify opportunities for facilitating the transfer of communication skills among modes and contexts, and (2) to balance instruction between fundamental principles of communication and techniques specific to a mode or software tool.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE ProComm 2016 - International Professional Communication Conference
ISBN (Electronic)9781509017614
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 2016
Event2016 International Professional Communication Conference, IEEE ProComm 2016 - Austin, United States
Duration: Oct 2 2016Oct 5 2016

Publication series

NameIEEE International Professional Communication Conference
Volume2016-November
ISSN (Print)2158-091X
ISSN (Electronic)2158-1002

Conference

Conference2016 International Professional Communication Conference, IEEE ProComm 2016
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityAustin
Period10/2/1610/5/16

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 IEEE.

Keywords

  • Design
  • Written communication
  • education
  • oral communication
  • speaking
  • visual communication
  • writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • General Engineering

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