Contact-induced crystallinity for high-performance soluble acene-based transistors and circuits

D. J. Gundlach, J. E. Royer, S. K. Park, S. Subramanian, O. D. Jurchescu, B. H. Hamadani, A. J. Moad, R. J. Kline, L. C. Teague, O. Kirillov, C. A. Richter, J. G. Kushmerick, L. J. Richter, S. R. Parkin, T. N. Jackson, J. E. Anthony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

447 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of organic materials presents a tremendous opportunity to significantly impact the functionality and pervasiveness of large-area electronics. Commercialization of this technology requires reduction in manufacturing costs by exploiting inexpensive lowerature deposition and patterning techniques, which typically lead to lower device performance. We report a low-cost approach to control the microstructure of solution-cast acene-based organic thin films through modification of interfacial chemistry. Chemically and selectively tailoring the source/drain contact interface is a novel route to initiating the crystallization of soluble organic semiconductors, leading to the growth on opposing contacts of crystalline films that extend into the transistor channel. This selective crystallization enables us to fabricate high-performance organic thin-film transistors and circuits, and to deterministically study the influence of the microstructure on the device characteristics. By connecting device fabrication to molecular design, we demonstrate that rapid film processing under ambient room conditions and high performance are not mutually exclusive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-221
Number of pages6
JournalNature Materials
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support under the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) by the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged by J.E.R. L.C.T., A.J.M. and B.H.H. acknowledge financial support from the National Research Council postdoctoral fellowship program. J.E.A. acknowledges the Office of Naval Research for financial support of synthesis efforts. D.J.G. acknowledges L. Loo, Princeton U., for many helpful discussions concerning nucleation and film microstructure, and B. Vogel, visiting assistant professor at Bucknell University, for assistance with preliminary differential scanning calorimetry measurements. Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to D.J.G. Supplementary Information accompanies this paper on www.nature.com/naturematerials.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemistry
  • General Materials Science
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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