Contributions of body-composition characteristics to critical power and anaerobic work capacity

M. Travis Byrd, Jonathan Robert Switalla, Joel E. Eastman, Brian J. Wallace, Jody L. Clasey, Haley C. Bergstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Critical power (CP) and anaerobic work capacity (AWC) from the CP test represent distinct parameters related to metabolic characteristics of the whole body and active muscle tissue, respectively. Purpose: To examine the contribution of whole-body composition characteristics and local lean mass to further elucidate the differences in metabolic characteristics between CP and AWC as they relate to whole body and local factors. Methods: Fifteen anaerobically trained men were assessed for whole-body (% body fat and mineral-free lean mass [LBM]) and local mineral-free thigh lean mass (TLM) composition characteristics. CP and AWC were determined from the 3-min all-out CP test. Statistical analyses included Pearson product–moment correlations and stepwise multiple-regression analyses (P ? .05). Results: Only LBM contributed significantly to the prediction of CP (CP = 2.3 [LBM] + 56.7 [r2 = .346, standard error of the estimate (SEE) = 31.4 W, P = .021]), and only TLM to AWC (AWC = 0.8 [TLM] + 3.7 [r2 = .479, SEE = 2.2 kJ, P = .004]). Conclusions: The aerobic component (CP) of the CP test was most closely related to LBM, and the anaerobic component (AWC) was more closely related to the TLM. These findings support the theory that CP and AWC are separate measures of whole-body metabolic capabilities and the energy stores in the activated local muscle groups, respectively. Thus, training programs to improve CP and AWC should be designed to include resistance-training exercises to increase whole-body LBM and local TLM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-193
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • Cycle performance
  • Exercise metabolism
  • Fatigue thresholds
  • Lean muscle mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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