Delay discounting and self-reported impulsivity in adolescent smokers and nonsmokers living in rural Appalachia

Russell Lewis, Millie Harris, Stacey A. Slone, Brent J. Shelton, Brady Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objectives This study evaluated whether impulsivity (delay discounting and BIS-11-A) is associated with adolescent smoking status in a region with strong environmental risk factors for smoking. Methods Forty-two adolescent smokers and nonsmokers from rural Appalachia completed discounting and self-reported impulsivity assessments. Results The BIS-11-A, but not the measure of discounting, was associated with smoking status; however, neither assessment predicted smoking status once parent/best-friend smoking variables were statistically accounted for. Discussion and Conclusions In regions with strong environmental risk factors for smoking, delay discounting may play a more limited role in risk of initiation. Scientific Significance Helps to better define impulsivity as risk factors for smoking in relation to familial and broader cultural variables.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)492-494
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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