Depression and Anxiety Are Associated With Increased Health Care Costs and Opioid Use for Patients With Femoroacetabular Impingement Undergoing Hip Arthroscopy: Analysis of a Claims Database

Cale A. Jacobs, Greg S. Hawk, Kate N. Jochimsen, Caitlin E.W. Conley, Ana Maria Vranceanu, Katherine L. Thompson, Stephen T. Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if opioid use and health care costs in the year before and following hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) differ between those with or without depression or anxiety. Methods: Using the Truven Health Marketscan database, FAI patients who underwent hip arthroscopy between October 2010 and December 2015 were identified (Current Procedural Terminology codes 29914 [femoroplasty], 29915 [acetabuloplasty], and/or 29916 [labral repair]). Patients were excluded if they had incomplete coverage for 1 year either before or following surgery. The number of patients with 1 or more claims related to depression or anxiety during the year before surgery was quantified (International Statistical Classification Diseases and Related Health-9 codes 296, 298, 300, 309, 311). Health care costs in the year before and following hip arthroscopy were compared between those with or without depression or anxiety. We also compared the number of patients in each group who filled a narcotic pain prescription within 180 days before surgery as well as >60 or >90 days after hip arthroscopy. Results: Depression or anxiety claims were seen in 5,208/14,830 patients (35.1%) before surgery. A significantly greater proportion of those with preoperative depression or anxiety filled opioid-related prescriptions in the 6 months before surgery (36.2% vs 25.6%, P < .0001) and both >60 days (31.3% vs 24.7%, P < .0001) and >90 days after surgery (29.5% vs 23.4%, P < .0001). The group with preoperative depression or anxiety had significantly greater health care costs both before ($8,775 vs $5,674, P < .0001) and following surgery ($5,287 vs $3,908, P < .0001). Conclusions: Both before and following hip arthroscopy, opioid use and health care costs were significantly greater for FAI patients with comorbid depression or anxiety. Level of Evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative therapeutic study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)745-750
Number of pages6
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Arthroscopy Association of North America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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