Dietary iron restriction prevents further deterioration of renal damage in a chronic kidney disease rat model

Yoshiro Naito, Aya Fujii, Hisashi Sawada, Shinichi Hirotani, Toshihiro Iwasaku, Yoshitaka Okuhara, Akiyo Eguchi, Mitsumasa Ohyanagi, Takeshi Tsujino, Tohru Masuyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Iron accumulation is associated with the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, little is known about the effects of isolated iron restriction against CKD. We have recently reported that iron restriction prevents the development of renal damage in the well established 5/6 nephrectomy rat model of CKD. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic effects of iron restriction on preexisting hypertension and renal damage in a rat model of CKD. Methods: CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy in Sprague-Dawley rats. After surgery, 5/6 nephrectomized rats were given an iron-restricted diet from 1 day to 16 weeks for prevention protocol or from 8 to 16 weeks for rescue protocol. Other CKD rats were given a normal diet. Results: At 16 weeks after surgery, CKD rats developed hypertension and renal damage. Early intervention with iron restriction prevented the development of hypertension and vascular remodeling. By contrast, late intervention with iron restriction did not remarkably ameliorate preexisting hypertension and vascular remodeling in CKD rats. On the contrary, late intervention with iron restriction prevented further progression of preexisting renal damage in CKD rats. Interestingly, iron restriction led to increased urinary sodium and decreased urinary potassium excretions in CKD rats. Moreover, iron restriction markedly attenuated renal expression of nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor and Rac1 activity in CKD rats. Conclusion: Iron restriction prevented further deterioration of preexisting renal damage. The beneficial effects of iron restriction on renal damage seem to be associated with inhibition of renal mineralocorticoid receptor signaling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1203-1213
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Keywords

  • chronic kidney disease
  • hypertension
  • iron
  • mineralocorticoid receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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