Digestibility of energy and concentrations of metabolizable energy and net energy varies among sources of bakery meal when fed to growing pigs

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Abstract

The null hypothesis that there are no differences in concentrations of digestible energy (DE), metabolizable energy (ME), and net energy (NE) among different sources of bakery meal was tested in a regional experiment involving 5 of the universities on the North Central Coordinating Committee-42 on Swine Nutrition. Eleven sources of bakery meal were procured from the swine producing areas in the United States and included in one diet as the only energy containing ingredient, and each diet was then divided into 5 batches that were used at the University of Illinois, Purdue University, University of Kentucky, University of Nebraska, and North Carolina State University. At each university, diets were fed to 22 growing pigs (2 pigs per diet) that were placed in metabolism crates, and feces and urine were collected for 5 d after a 7-d adaptation period. Diets and collected samples of feces and urine were dried and analyzed for gross energy. The apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter (DM) and gross energy and concentrations of DE, ME, and NE were calculated. Results indicated that there were considerable variation in the nutritional composition among the different sources of bakery meal with relatively large coefficients of variation for crude protein, starch, and acid hydrolyzed ether extract, but it was possible to analyze all sources of bakery meal to account for 100% of the ingredients. The average DE, ME, and NE in the 11 sources of bakery meal was 3,827, 3,678, and 2,799 kcal/kg DM, respectively. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, differences (P < 0.05) among sources of bakery meal in concentrations of DE (3,827 ± 201 kcal/kg DM), ME 3,678 ± 200 kcal/kg DM), and NE (2,799 ± 156 kcal/kg DM) were observed, but the variation among the 11 sources of bakery meal was not greater than what is usually observed among different sources of other ingredients. The differences observed are likely a consequence of the different product streams and production procedures used to produce the bakery meal. In conclusion, the average DE, ME, and NE in 11 sources of bakery meal is close to values previously reported, but there is some variation among sources depending on origin.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberskad297
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume101
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • bakery meal
  • digestible energy
  • metabolizable energy
  • net energy
  • pigs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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